Posts Tagged ‘forgettable’

OHMC: Forget Me Not (2009)

Posted: October 13, 2012 in Movies
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Oh, but I thought that I was going to like this one. There’s a moment in most films that hooks me, and I know precisely at that moment that I’m going to like the film. It’s not usually a big plot point, either–the majority of the time, it’s a tiny little inconsequential thing that suddenly gives me the feeling that I’ve got a personal connection with the filmmaker and that I’ll gladly go wherever he or she leads. It happened with Polanski’s Repulsion, it happened with A Tale of Two Sisters, and I thought that it had happened with this film. The moment in question occurs very early in the film, at the big party scene near the beginning. There’s a long involved shot that starts in one room on one teenaged couple, then moves to another room and another couple, and ends up on yet another couple. My thought was that this was a pretty ambitious camera move for a low-budget horror film, so my expectations went up mightily. But my instincts were wrong this time, and the film came crashing back down to earth pretty quickly. For me, there were two main factors that finally killed my interest in the film: an overly-complex script, and a stupid game chant that all the characters knew as children. I wasn’t totally down with the whole “One, two, Freddy’s coming for you” rhyme in A Nightmare on Elm Street, because it seemed a little far-fetched…but the chant in this one was waaaaay unbelievable. “Release the one ignored by heaven”…really? “Forgotten souls erased by time?” No way. Kids just don’t play like that. My final verdict: There’s nothing in Forget Me Not that you won’t forget…and soon.

OHMC: Deadgirl (2008)

Posted: October 10, 2012 in Movies
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Perplexing film about two high school boys who, while skipping school one afternoon, find a dead girl, naked and chained to a table, in a remote corner of the basement of an abandoned mental hospital. In this instance, though, “dead” is a subjective term, as the girl keeps moving even after having had her neck broken and being shot three times by one of the boys. Still, being teenage boys, one of them sees the sexual possibilities inherent in the situation and things rapidly get a) out of hand and b) disgusting. While I really wanted to like the film, I never felt as engaged with the story as I wanted to be. The blame for this falls on the directors more than on the screenwriter–I get the feeling that they wanted the film’s tone to be seen as “intense,” when in actuality it comes much closer to being seen as “languid.” The screenwriter doesn’t escape all blame, though, as the film takes out a full-page newspaper ad announcing the ending about 75 minutes in. Although I hate to say it, Deadgirl ends up being pretty forgettable.